Negotiations have not been easy. In October 1972, Henry Kissinger had drawn up a peace agreement with the North Vietnamese. However, Nguyen Van Thieu, the president of South Vietnam, refused to sign and the North Vietnamese withdrew from the talks. The Paris Peace Agreement (Vietnamese: Hiep enh Paris v` Viét Nam), officially titled “Agreement for the End of War and the Restoration of Peace in Vietnam” (Hipénh v`ch`m d`t chién tranh, the ở peace agreement signed on January 27, 1973 to make peace in Vietnam was a peace treaty signed on January 27, 1973. The treaty included the governments of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (north of Vietnam), the Republic of Vietnam (south of Vietnam) and the United States, as well as the Republic of South Vietnam (PRG), which represented the indigenous revolutionaries of South Vietnam. Until that time, American ground forces had been sidelined with degraded morality and gradually withdrew to coastal areas, without participating in any offensives or numerous direct struggles for the previous two-year period. [1] [2] In exchange, the Paris Agreement would eliminate all remaining U.S. forces, including air and naval forces. Direct U.S.

military intervention ended and fighting between the three remaining powers was temporarily suspended for less than a day. [3] The agreement was not ratified by the U.S. Senate. T42 [5] According to Finnish historian Jussi Hanhimki, southern Vietnam was put under pressure because of the triangular diplomacy that isolated it to accept an agreement that virtually ensured its collapse. [21] During the negotiations, Kissinger stated that 18 months after an agreement, the United States would not intervene militarily, but that it could intervene before. In the history of the Vietnam War, this has been described as a “decent interval.” [22] On January 15, 1973, President Nixon announced the suspension of offensive actions against North Vietnam. On January 23, Kissinger and Tha met again and signed a contract substantially identical to the project three months earlier. The agreement was signed by the heads of the official delegations on 27 January 1973 at the Majestic Hotel in Paris. When Thiu, who had not even been informed of the secret negotiations, presented the draft new agreement, he was furious with Kissinger and Nixon (perfectly aware of South Vietnam`s negotiating position) and refused to accept them without substantial changes. He then gave several public radio speeches, saying that the proposed agreement was worse than it actually was. Hanoi was stunned because he believed he had been deceived by Kissinger in a propaganda tour.